After our one full day in St. Petersburg, we had about half of the next day left before our scheduled train to Moscow. The only thing that I’d scheduled for us in the morning was a little tour of the historic 1916 Krasin icebreaker. It didn’t look that far away on the Google map, but we later found out that Google had pegged the wrong address. So we walked a hurried two miles, my husband carrying our son the whole time, and made it just in time for our own personal English tour of the ship.

There happened to be two other icebreakers in town at the time, but the Krasin is officially a museum, and I thought our son would like it. Turns out, he had no patience for the information our guide was trying to impart, but he was happy to try and run all over the ship. We still managed to see some neat things like a model of the Fram, Roald Amundsen’s ship that he took to the Antarctic when he won the race to the South Pole, a large stuffed polar bear, the communications room where we all got to try our hand at tapping out Morse code. Our guide even let our son ring the ship’s bell on the bow.

The Krasin icebreaker.

The Krasin icebreaker.

A bit of Morse code.

A bit of Morse code.

At the end of the tour I asked our guide if he had been in the Russian navy. He said, no, that he had actually been on a research vessel for 30 years. Even more interesting! For a bit more of the ship’s history and some visitor info, check out this great St. Petersburg tourist site.

After the tour we packed up the hotel room and took a taxi to the Moskovsky train station. We arrived early for our 3:00 Sapsan high-speed train but didn’t see too much in the way of snack places, so we hopped on the train and hoped there’d be some kind of dining car. It turned out that a three-course meal and drinks were included in the price of the ticket! So we sat comfortably in our leather seats and tried to keep our son entertained while the Russian countryside, which looked disappointingly like Oregon without a hint of Dr. Zhivago, flew by, and we snacked on bread, cheese, fruit, potatoes, and beef in tomato sauce followed by fruit tarts and chocolate cake. I decided to follow the lead of the Russians sitting around me and had a Russian Standard brand vodka and tomato juice.

The Sapsan high-speed train to Moscow.

The Sapsan high-speed train to Moscow.

Russian Standard vodka and tomato juice.

Russian Standard vodka and tomato juice.

We had booked an English-speaking taxi through a recommended website called Welcome Taxi. It was very easy to book online, and it was great to have someone waiting to meet us as we literally stepped off the train. From there, we checked into the Courtyard Marriott City Centre hotel, which was only a few blocks from Red Square and had a similar set up as the last hotel (additional baby bed, view over indoor courtyard, breakfast buffet) but with a slightly more abrupt staff.

The train ride was about four hours, so it was close to 8:30pm by the time we got settled in our room. Again, room service was the diners’ choice, so we had some burgers and fries sent up and called it a night. I know it’s not very adventurous, but they actually didn’t have anything particularly Russian on the menu.

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